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Rep. Ayanna Pressley tests negative for COVID-19

Updated 5:18 PM ET, Fri March 27, 2020

Washington (CNN) - Democratic Rep. Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts announced on Friday that she tested negative for coronavirus after experiencing flu-like symptms.

"I am relieved to report that I have tested negative for COVID-19. I am, however still recovering from the flu, but feeling much better and continuing to work remotely with my team on COVID-19 response," she said in a statement.

As lawmakers on Capitol Hill grapple with how to contain the spread of coronavirus across the United States, at least 36 members of Congress have announced steps to self-quarantine or otherwise isolate themselves because they're feeling ill or as a precaution after either coming into direct contact or potentially coming into contact with an infected individual.

Republican Rep. Mark Meadows of North Carolina, President Donald Trump's incoming White House chief of staff, announced on Monday that he was working at the White House as he transitions into the new role after a period of self-quarantine.

Here are the rest of the impacted lawmakers:

Ted Cruz

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas announced on March 17 that he had completed a period of self-quarantine. Cruz told reporters that he felt "great" and "strong" on his first day back at the Capitol.

On March 8, Cruz said he would "remain at my home in Texas" after contact with an individual at the Conservative Political Action Conference who tested positive. Cruz said on March 13 that he would extend the self-quarantine after "a second interaction" with an individual who tested positive.

Matt Gaetz

Florida Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz announced on March 10 that his coronavirus test results came back negative.

On March 9, he announced that he came into contact with an individual at CPAC who had tested positive and would self-quarantine.

Doug Collins

Republican Rep. Doug Collins of Georgia announced on March 9 that he would self-quarantine after CPAC organizers found of photo him and the conference attendee who tested positive.

Paul Gosar

Republican Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona put out a statement on March 8 saying that he was similarly notified that during CPAC he was in contact with an individual who had tested positive and "remain at my home in Arizona until the conclusion of the 14-day period following my interaction with this individual."

Julia Brownley

Democratic Rep. Julia Brownley of California put out a statement on March 9 saying that she met with an infected individual and as a result she and her staff would work remotely.

On March 18, the congresswoman said that neither she or her staff have shown any symptoms but would continue to telework.

Don Beyer

Democratic Rep. Don Beyer of Virginia said in a statement on March 10 that he will self-quarantine after having dinner with an individual who later tested positive for coronavirus.

Rick Scott

Florida Republican Sen. Rick Scott announced on March 12 that he would self-quarantine after potentially coming into contact with a member of the Brazilian delegation who tested positive for coronavirus.

Lindsey Graham

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham announced on March 15 that he tested negative for coronavirus.

Graham's office released a statement on March 12 saying that he would self-quarantine as a precutionary measure because he "was at Mar-a-Lago last weekend. He has no recollection of direct contact with the President of Brazil, who is awaiting results of a coronavirus test, or his spokesman who tested positive."

John Yarmuth

Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky announced on March 16 that he tested negative for coronavirus after self-quarantining following an interaction with someone who later tested positive.

Ben Ray Luján

Rep. Ben Ray Luján of New Mexico, a member of House Democratic leadership, said on March 16 that he will self-quarantine after an interaction with an infected individual.

The congressman is now out of quarantine and on March 27 he was back in Washington to speak on the House floor ahead of a final vote on economic stimulus legislation.

Gwen Moore

Democratic Rep. Gwen Moore of Wisconsin announced on March 16 that she came into contact with an individual who tested positive and would self-quarantine.

Cory Gardner

Republican Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado was back in Washington on March 25 after completing a period of self-quarantine.

"It is great to be back on the floor of the US Senate," he said, adding that his time in self-quarantine "expired as of this morning."

The senator's office announced on March 17 that the GOP senator decided to self-quarantine after coming into contact with a Colorado constituent who was visiting Washington, DC, and later tested positive for the coronavirus.

Jason Crow

Democratic Rep. Jason Crow of Colorado, a freshman whose national profile was elevated during the Senate impeachment trial when he served as a House impeachment manager, announced on March 17 that he would self-quarantine after coming into contact with "a constituent who later tested positive for coronavirus."

His period of self-quarantine has now come to an end and he was back in Washington on March 27 to vote on economic stimulus legislation to respond to the coronavirus crisis.

Matt Cartwright

Democratic Rep. Matt Cartwright of Pennsylvania announced on March 18 that he would self-quarantine after interacting with "a family friend" who later tested positive for coronavirus.

Drew Ferguson

Republican Rep. Drew Ferguson of Georgia said March 18 on Twitter that he was going into self-quarantine after being in contact with a member of Congress who has tested positive for coronavirus.

"Today, the Attending Physician of the United States Congress informed me that I was in contact with a member of Congress on March 13th that has since tested positive for COVID-19," Ferguson tweeted.

Steve Scalise

Republican Whip Steve Scalise of Louisiana said in a statement on March 18 that he was going into self-quarantine after he held an "extended meeting" with Diaz-Balart, who has tested positive for coronavirus.

Ann Wagner

Republican Rep. Ann Wagner of Missouri said in a statement March 18 that she was going into self-quarantine after participating "in a small group meeting" with a member of Congress who has tested positive for coronavirus.

"After discussions with the Attending Physician of the United States Congress, and out of an abundance of caution, I will be self-quarantining," she said.

Stephanie Murphy

Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy of Florida said March 18 on Twitter that she was going into self-quarantine after having "contact with a fellow Member of Congress who has tested positive for COVID-19."

Kathleen Rice

Democratic Rep. Kathleen Rice of New York said on March 18 that she was heading into self-quarantine after learning "someone I was in contact with last Friday has tested positive" for coronavirus.

Kendra Horn

Democratic Rep. Kendra Horn of Oklahoma said on March 19 that she was "going into a precautionary two-week self-quarantine" after having contact with McAdams who tested positive for the virus earlier in the week.

Anthony Brindisi

Democratic Rep. Anthony Brindisi of New York announced on March 19 that he will telework from his home due to prior contact with congressman McAdams, who tested positive.

Joe Cunningham

Democratic Rep. Joe Cunningham of South Carolina said on March 19 that he would self-quarantine after contact with a member of Congress who tested positive.

Tom Cole

Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma announced on March 19 that he would self-quarantine following the news that Diaz-Balart tested positive, saying that he was "around him for an extended period last week."

David Schweikert

Republican Rep. David Schweikert of Arizona said on March 15 that he would be working from home "until otherwise told by doctors" after learning that "a member of our DC team" with whom he interacted tested positive.

David Price

Democratic Rep. David Price of North Carolina announced on March 19 that he would self-quarantine after learning that one of his colleagues "with whom I work closely" tested positive.

Adam Schiff

Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff, a Californian and the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, announced on March 15 that he would be "taking additional distancing precautions, including postponing meetings and teleworking" after learning that a former staffer tested positive.

Sharice Davids

Democratic Rep. Sharice Davids of Kansas said on March 19 that she would self-quarantine after she had contact with a "fellow member of Congress who recently tested positive for COVID-19."

Andy Kim

Democratic Rep. Andy Kim of New Jersey announced on March 19 that he will self-quarantine due to "direct contact" with another member of Congress who tested positive.

Vicente Gonzalez

Democratic Rep. Vicente Gonzalez of Texas announced on March 25 that he tested negative, saying "While I have tested negative, I will continue to follow the advice of medical experts and maintain social distancing practices as I work on behalf of the 15th District of Texas."

He had previously announced on March 19 that the week prior he had been "in close contact with a colleague" who has since tested positive. As a result, he said, "I have decided to voluntarily self-quarantine."

Mike Lee

Republican Sen. Mike Lee of Utah announced on March 22 that he will self-quarantine following the news that Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky has tested positive for coronavirus.

"Upon learning that my colleague Sen. Paul tested positive for COVID-19, I consulted the Attending Physician of the U.S. Congress Dr. Harding. He advised me that because I have no symptoms or other risk factors, a COVID-19 test was not warranted. However, given the timing, proximity, and duration of my exposure to Sen. Paul, he directed me to self-quarantine for 14 days," Lee said in a statement.

He added, "That means no traveling or voting. But I will continue to make sure Utah's voice is heard as we shape the federal response to the Coronavirus through phone, text, email and whatever other means are available."

Mitt Romney

Republican Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah announced on March 24 that he tested negative for coronavirus, but will remain in self-quarantine until the 14-day period.

"Thankfully I've tested negative for COVID-19. Nevertheless, guidance from my physician, consistent with the CDC guidelines, requires me to remain in quarantine as the test does not rule out the onset of symptoms during the 14-day period," Romney tweeted.

Trump responded mockingly to the test results of his longtime political foe, tweeting, "I am so happy I can barely speak."

Josh Gottheimer

Democratic Rep. Josh Gottheimer of New Jersey announced on March 24 that he will self-quarantine after attending a press conference with Mike Maron, the CEO of Holy Name Medical Center, who later tested positive for coronavirus.

"The Congressman has had no symptoms and continues to work around-the-clock for the Fifth District from his home," a statement from his office said.

Seth Moulton

Democratic Rep. Seth Moulton of Massachusetts said in a statement on March 25 that he is planning to self-quarantine until March 28 after showing symptoms consistent with coronavirus since last week -- and unable to get a test.

"As the House doctor explained, I am 'symptomatic,' but because the symptoms are minor and a test would not change my treatment protocol, my wife and I don't qualify for tests," Moulton said. "As a result, and out of an abundance of caution, I will follow my doctors' direction and continue to stay home and self-quarantine until I hit seven days after my symptoms started to improve and I do not have a fever for 72 hours. Unless my symptoms take a turn for the worse, that would be this Saturday."

Katie Porter

Democratic Rep. Katie Porter of California announced on March 27 that she tested negative for coronavirus.

She had previously announced on March 25 that she was in self-quarantine as she awaited test results.

Ayanna Pressley

Democratic Rep. Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts announced on March 27 that she tested negative for COVID-19.

"I am relieved to report that I have tested negative for COVID-19. I am, however still recovering from the flu, but feeling much better and continuing to work remotely with my team on COVID-19 response," she said.

She was previosly self-quarantining at home after her office said that she was awaiting the results of a coronavirus test.

Lizzie Fletcher

Democratic Rep. Lizzie Fletcher of Texas announced Thursday she is self-quarantining as she awaits the results of a coronavirus test.

"After experiencing flu-like symptoms, including a temperature above 101 degrees, Congresswoman Fletcher sought professional medical treatment out of an abundance of caution. At the determination of her physician, she was tested for COVID-19 today. She will continue to work from home until she receives her test results," her office said in a statement.

This story has been updated with additional developments Thursday.


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